Weight Loss Surgery on Kids.

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Pikachu
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Weight Loss Surgery on Kids.

Postby Pikachu » Wed Jan 4, 11:25 2017

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/01/08/healt ... rgery.html

One percent to 2 percent of all weight-loss, or bariatric, operations are on patients under 21, but studies are under way to gauge the outcomes of surgery on children as young as 12.

https://www.nasw.org/users/Katwong/publ ... tfood.html

Last week, a statewide survey revealed that 71 percent of California high school districts serve fast foods including pizza, hamburgers, soda and french fries for student lunches and that those menu items - which are high in fat, salt and sugar and offer little nutrition - make up 70 percent of all school food sales.More than half of the 171 districts also reported carrying brand-name products from chains such as Taco Bell and Domino's Pizza.

McDonalds and KFC are in there too. I've seen it on a documentary.

The USDA guidelines says students are required at least 2 vegetables at lunch. Refined tomato sauce, french fries and pizza count as vegetables under those same guidelines.

So let me get this straight. America would rather feed kids fast food junk and then study operating on children's stomachs, and actually dissect their stomachs when they get older, instead of saying no to big business and not setting them up for dietary failure.


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Re: Weight Loss Surgery on Kids.

Postby Eravial » Wed Jan 4, 17:33 2017

I do find this rather sad. While it's great that we have the medical advances to allow for surgical treatments of various health issues, they are always traumatic and risky to some degree, and thus not ideal. Still, it's an oversimplification to say that people are deciding against healthy food in favor of having surgery instead. Humans are notoriously bad at making good choices when the negative outcomes are delayed and compounded; it isn't really a conscious decision. There are a lot of factors that have contributed to the trend of juvenile obesity and weight-loss surgery. Briefly (and not comprehensively):

School and supplemental nutrition funding - healthy food generally costs more, and these programs are underfunded.
Simplified palate - The nutritional value of food becomes irrelevant if the child won't eat it. Since we don't force-feed kids, there has to be a balance between nutrition and palatability. While any kid can be a picky eater, kids that aren't exposed to lots of different foods (i.e. poor kids, kids whose parents were raised with a limited diet, etc) typically have narrower preferences.
Stress - there are a lot of constant stressors and a lack of personal freedom in modern society. Tasty food gives many people pleasure. When people don't have access to other forms of comfort, they may indulge in food. Kids are increasingly controlled and have little autonomy. If the only independence they have is in choosing what to eat (or not eat), they may utilize this opportunity to eat whatever they like best.
Cultural pressure to be thin - some technically obese but healthy people (of all ages) get weight-loss surgery because of stigma against fatness rather than because of a medical need. Doctors also have biases against fatness and may recommend surgery when it's not medically necessary.
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Re: Weight Loss Surgery on Kids.

Postby SpicyX » Sat Jan 14, 13:21 2017

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Re: Weight Loss Surgery on Kids.

Postby Sonic# » Sat Jan 14, 15:17 2017


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Re: Weight Loss Surgery on Kids.

Postby SpicyX » Sat Jan 14, 16:44 2017

Having lived on shoestring budgets myself raising children while going to school full time, I don't buy the notion that "junk food is all poor people can afford." It's a matter of understanding the value of good nutrition and prioritizing the time and funds to make it happen. And nutrition is just one element of the obesity factor--It is also important to educate on the value of proper exercise.

It really is fundamentally a matter of education, which in turn shapes values, which in turn shapes priorities. And this ends up being true not only in households, but also institutions, organizations, and society at large.
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Re: Weight Loss Surgery on Kids.

Postby Aum » Sat Jan 14, 22:08 2017

This makes me angry.

The reasons for obesity are known. It has been spelled out loud and clear. High calorie, high sugar, nutrient deficient diets lead to obesity in children. Pre-packaged foods with artificial additives are filled with pseudo-estrogens which increase water weight and fat retention.

Yet modern medicine turns around and wants to partition kids stomachs into 1/3 the size so that they can go on eating the same crap all day, they just won't be able to physically eat as much.

American kids are starving and the medical industry, with its links to big pharma and big agro, are all pretending like they don't know the reason so that people will get bariartric surgery and become medical dependents for life.

Maybe if the government would stop subsidizing corn, sugar and soy, junk food wouldn't be cheaper than real food.
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