development balalnce

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development balalnce

Postby melsbells » Sun Nov 6, 13:49 2016

I pulled the categories of development from this somewhat chosen at random website on child development. It devides development into five categories:

Cognitive Development
This is the child's ability to learn and solve problems. For example, this includes a two-month-old baby learning to explore the environment with hands or eyes or a five-year-old learning how to do simple math problems.

Social and Emotional Development
This is the child's ability to interact with others, including helping themselves and self-control. Examples of this type of development would include: a six-week-old baby smiling, a ten-month-old baby waving bye-bye, or a five-year-old boy knowing how to take turns in games at school.

Speech and Language Development
This is the child's ability to both understand and use language. For example, this includes a 12-month-old baby saying his first words, a two-year-old naming parts of her body, or a five-year-old learning to say "feet" instead of "foots".

Fine Motor Skill Development
This is the child's ability to use small muscles, specifically their hands and fingers, to pick up small objects, hold a spoon, turn pages in a book, or use a crayon to draw.

Gross Motor Skill Development
This is the child's ability to use large muscles. For example, a six-month-old baby learns how to sit up with some support, a 12-month-old baby learns to pull up to a stand holding onto furniture, and a five-year-old learns to skip.


Every kid develops at their own rate. I know this. Everyone seems to know this. I hear it all the time. But I've been struck recently that kids aren't balanced.

My kid is awesome at fine motor skills and language, around expected for cogitive abilities, but really behind with social/emotional and gross motor skill development. Then I think of myself, and I would say I also struggle with gross motor skills and emotional development.

How do(es) your kid(s) lean? How do you lean in comparison? Does anyone have a balanced kid or feel balanced themselves?

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Re: development balalnce

Postby Sonic# » Sun Nov 6, 14:14 2016

I was proficient in fine/gross motor skills and cognitive development for my age, but I was further behind in speech/language development and social/emotional development. I caught up in them perhaps by ages 5-7, with vestiges of social issues lasting longer (like my temper). There was nothing inherently bad about being a bit off in timing, though in my case my imbalance was severe enough that I did need professional help from a speech pathologist.

Today I'd say I'm pretty balanced. I'm a competent athlete in terms of both overall motions and fine-tuning. I'm pretty good at language and emotional balance. New social situations make me feel somewhat awkward, but I've also learned that many other people feel the same way about novel contexts, so I think I'm with the curve there.

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Re: development balalnce

Postby DarkOne » Sun Nov 6, 18:24 2016

My kids participated in an early childhood education and development screening program, and their periodic assessments were divided into those 5 general areas. The evaluation results for each area could be either "seems on schedule", "close to cutoff, monitor closely", or "further assessment by child development professional is recommended". My kids usually test on schedule for each area, which I guess would qualify them as balanced, but it was clear every time that there were areas that they were rocking and areas in which they were not rocking as much (this always seems to be fine motor). Our evaluator always stressed that the norm was for kids to excel in some areas and lag in others. She also suggested that we could use the assessment results to help guide us and help us determine which activities would provide opportunities for development in their least proficient areas.

I'm pretty balanced, for the most part. Any imbalances I have I can correlate to voluntary lack of exercise in that particular area.
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Re: development balalnce

Postby rowan » Sun Nov 6, 21:11 2016

My kid seems to jump in spurts in any of those, it's kind of random. Right now I think we're. .. I wont' say lagging, exactly, but compared to other skills she's less into the... hm. Solve problems? one? Not sure. Wherever "noticing things and making connections between them" things. She's pretty great at math but not so much on the paying attention to details? Like, extracting information from a situation and applying it (whether that's a word problem, or a real life situation). I think maybe she's just impatient and doesn't pay attention? Not sure. Also no idea where it is relative to her peers. She is on the younger end of her class and sometimes I can tell that.

Last year we seriously lagged behind in reading; we never pushed it, and it turned out apparently we should have maybe tried a little more the summer before 2nd grade to get her into it. I didn't think it was an issue until 3rd grade, though. Eh. Whatever, she's fine now. I try not to pressure, kids are so variable.
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Re: development balalnce

Postby melsbells » Wed Nov 9, 15:12 2016

It's a great point that the scales often tip in different directions at different times. I can see how I could provide opportunities for the first four categories, but how does someone go about encouraging gross motor skills? I was under the impression that out of all development, that one was sort of automatic, like physical growth.

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Re: development balalnce

Postby lyra211 » Sat Dec 3, 14:16 2016

My 9-month-old seems to hit most of his milestones the week before they are supposed to happen. The week before he turned 9 months old, I'd been looking at the milestones on the CDC website and was worried because he hadn't started pulling himself to a standing position, and then all of a sudden he did it the Saturday before he turned 9 months old (while we were skyping with grandparents -- they were very happy to be there for that moment!). He's been pretty much exactly on schedule or a little ahead for every category except language/communication. He still doesn't point at things or copy gestures, which the CDC says a typical baby is doing by 9 months. That said, when I look at the older babies in his daycare, they're not very good at it either, so I've tried not to worry too much. He does have a friend who is 3 months younger than him who started clapping last week, which is ridiculously advanced for her age, but she's hit all of her milestones early -- about the same time as my son. I guess she's on a fast track. I try not to compare, and just enjoy our kids for who they are! That said, as a socially awkward dual academic couple, we've been concerned about keeping an eye out for autism signs. His pediatrician is laid back and totally unconcerned, but I've read that by 18 months there are particular signs that should cause you to seek evaluation, so we're keeping an eye out for those and trying to suppress our Type A tendencies in the meantime.

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Re: development balalnce

Postby Nachos » Wed Dec 7, 14:16 2016

I don't have a baby of my own, but my friend's baby is super talkative quite early and good at fine motor control and feeds herself lots, but didn't learn to crawl until recently and only now has shown interest in walking, but not solo. She's a bit older than a year. But she's happy and does learn things, just not all at the same rates.
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Re: development balalnce

Postby rinn » Fri Dec 16, 11:02 2016

Sonic# wrote:I was proficient in fine/gross motor skills and cognitive development for my age, but I was further behind in speech/language development and social/emotional development. I caught up in them perhaps by ages 5-7, with vestiges of social issues lasting longer (like my temper). There was nothing inherently bad about being a bit off in timing, though in my case my imbalance was severe enough that I did need professional help from a speech pathologist.

....New social situations make me feel somewhat awkward, but I've also learned that many other people feel the same way about novel contexts, so I think I'm with the curve there.


geez, are you my twin, sonic? XD

I grew up with definite lag in speech/language development. I had a speech pathologist in elementary school work on my -L-'s, -r-'s and -th-'s; and when I essentially "graduated" from it I was taken out of the IEP program. my mom and I now see that being a mistake. middle school went decently, but I struggled in language arts; and by the time I went into high school I was struggling in my history/English humanities course and Algebra. I struggled in English classes because of my inability to express myself through language clearly, and I struggled in algebra because I couldn't follow a thing my teacher was saying (we had someone tutor me who literally asked why she was tutoring me because I grasped the concepts five minutes after her explaining it).
my mom suspected ADHD, so I went to a psychologist and at sixteen I was diagnosed with mixed expressive receptive disorder.

I had pretty severe temper tantrums elementary through middle school. I turned into the polar opposite by high school-- an emotionally numb, socially awkward person; and went to therapy to deal with family/personal issues. throughout all that, though, I think I turned out okay. I still have some social anxiety, but overtime I've been getting better with it.

I'm no parent, so I won't pretend to know a lot; but I can at least share my mom's experience with me. she told me she went by her motherly instinct/gut feeling with me, did her research, and then seeked out help. some physicians, like the one I had, will push it under the rug like it's no big deal, that they will eventually learn. so don't be afraid to seek out more than one opinion.

so there's my rant/experience with unbalanced development delays...sorry for some of the run on sentences, but hope it made a bit of sense.


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