Ownership of stuff and freedom

Bitching, whining, complaining, and general negativity

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Nerd1987
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Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Nerd1987 » Tue Sep 1, 23:41 2015

So unless you have a fair amount of money you will live somewhere that has rules. Even subdivisions do. The more money you have the more you can be free and even get away with things that other people would be harassed by some form of authority or worse for. And getting less serious and more to the point of why I am venting: I paid almost 100 for four years of Microsoft office. I'm lucky I'm a student or it would have been roughly the same but for only one year. And you don't get a physical disk you have to download.

I'm all over the place and I'd blame being tired but I don't have to cause this is the rant forum :)

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by monk » Wed Sep 2, 12:04 2015

Open Office is free. Welcome to the digital age.

as for freedom, you have lots of it, but you're trading it for things you like and find convenient. You can own relatively cheep land where there are no rules at all, but this land is not close to the city or to the trappings of civilization (like fast internet access). So you trade some freedom for those perks of society. And it is a trade because if everyone did what they wanted with no rules all those perks would disintegrate pretty quickly.
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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Nerd1987 » Thu Sep 3, 0:02 2015

I wish I had read that before I activated office 365 just now haha.

however money makes things happen. You can have your cake and eat it too with enough money. I don't think everything works out to be fair and ideal for everyone. The biggest issue with money in my book is that it's the smart people who usually get it. I know people who aren't as intelligent but bust their asses and will never make money like a doctor. It's especially depressing to look at iq averages for various professions.

Anyway I digress. I just look at my dad and a couple other people who have a fair amount of money and can just do whatever the hell they like. It's frustrating.

I would like to live within 20 minutes of a metro area and have a yard and be able to do stupid things like hang my heavy bag up from a tree branch not concerned about mildew/assorted micro-organisms.

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by rowan » Thu Sep 3, 9:50 2015

I would argue that it's the privileged people who usually get it. You can be smart and not have the opportunities to get money and be stuck in poverty and you can be pretty dumb and inherit a boatload of money. Doctors may make a lot of money but they also come out of school with a shitload of debt, so their spending ability is not as high as you'd think until well down the road (if at all, depending on which subfield they are in).

You're just a student, give it time.
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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Sonic# » Thu Sep 3, 11:54 2015

I know very smart people who have ended up in professions and jobs that earn less money. As the Car Talk guys put it one time, a smart doctor is very good, but you also want a smart mechanic or a smart police officer. My own grandfather, the smartest person I know, was career military (enlisted) before doing heating and cooling repair, carpentry, and finally anything else he wanted. Intelligence helps with success as does hard work. If we're talking about access to more prestigious professions, that's where class (money + parents' education and involvement + school) and other privileges have a lot of influence.

And also social skills. One reason why more privileged people tend to succeed in the airy networks of finance and industry is that they already grew up exposed to the social conventions and practices that aid success in that system. They've seen it working and have had an opportunity to learn it already. More basically, they probably already use a dialect of English acceptable in formal and professional life. So in a way, it's about who you know and your capacity for communicating with people you don't know.

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Nerd1987 » Thu Sep 3, 22:11 2015

What I am saying is verifiable about the averages of iq of people in stem. However I'm sure that if there were a metric for social class rating it would be salient as well. You make me feel better cause hard workers find a way to be ok. Sometimes I think I'm a fool going into such a low paying profession vs amount of time and money invested (clinical mental health). But I know that passion and hard work will pay off somehow Thanks! :pizza:

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by rowan » Fri Sep 4, 22:15 2015

IQ tests are very biased, and racist in design. In fact, they were used specifically to argue against Black people getting rights and were also why Jewish people were re-defined as White (since they tested higher than White people at the time on the IQ test). I put zero stock in IQ tests. They do not measure what they claim to measure.
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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Zeph » Sat Sep 5, 5:33 2015

Switch to Mac! They last for years and are loaded with the iWork suite, which is comparable to Office and very user-friendly.

On my PC, I use Open Office. I would never pay for Microsoft Office, it should be included.

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Nerd1987 » Thu Sep 10, 13:01 2015

Yeah since I am not a big PC gamer anymore mac would probably be my best choice for next computer.

If I had authority over how IQ test scores were interpreted I would make a clear distinction between measures of fluid and crystallized intelligence. Crystallized intelligence is book smarts and I'm sure it varies based on where you are from. They measure working memory by using symbols of no significance to any particular culture/group and have you repeat them back at one point. They also have you manipulate blocks and make shapes but I think without giving multiple unique tests of each measure on different days you could be lucky to see the answer quickly one time and not another time. I personally did very good manipulating the blocks when my IQ was tested but I often can't think of the best way to pack a box without a trial and error approach in real life.

I would say that to get a very high IQ like in the 120s as many doctors have, you would have to have everything going for you: The test biased in your favor, and be genuinely intelligent. Thus I feel that doctors, engineers are more intelligent than the average person and it's just not fair! lol

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Enigma » Thu Sep 10, 15:37 2015

My understanding of iq tests is that they mostly measure spatial understanding and logic. If that's true its really only a small portion of what makes people smart. I think I'd do well but if you start testing me on random factoids I'm going to start looking much less good pretty quick.
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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Gnarlbanya » Thu Sep 10, 18:18 2015

But knowing random factoids is more about memory and also probably a reflection of how widely you read. Whilst there's probably a correlation between wide reading and intelligence, I don't think random knowledge in and of itself is a measure of intelligence, although it might be a sign that you are intellectually curious and therefore more likely to think things through and puzzle things out.

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Sonic# » Thu Sep 10, 19:12 2015

That's the conceit of any kind of assessment. They have a goal of assessing intelligence, but the test actually measures how quickly we're able to solve a series of puzzles, and IQ (theoretically) measures one's result against the statistical modeling of a lot of results for this test. So if I'm two standard deviations above the average (around a 130) in being able to go through that selection of puzzles, I might be more intelligent in some ways, I might be more spatially intelligent, I might do preassigned tasks really well - my trouble with IQ is that people want to overgeneralize significance.

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Nerd1987 » Thu Sep 10, 20:00 2015

I am very passionate and opinionated about inequity and about intelligence that's why I keep going and going here. However as you may have noticed I am opinionated in general.

I think they put a big focus on working memory in general in psychology. The idea being that you can make more complicated assessments if you can hold more items in the view of your focus at one time. I personally was humbled by my IQ score. I did very well in k-12 in hard sciences and math. My IQ was not even one standard deviation above the average (112). To preserve my delusion of being amazing at life I remember that I had untreated anxiety and ADHD at the time of my test.

In reality I am probably more intellectually curious like Gnar mentioned some people are. I am always reading about stuff I am interested in and forming my own theories about how things might work or how I could do things differently at work etc.

*I don't recall how working memory interacts with spacial processing but I do remember that there was some concept that there is a viseospacial sketchpad but I don't know if that is overlapping with working memory now i want to go read up on it or watch some lectures. More likely I will veg out on the couch and eat hummus and chips while watching tv.

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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Enigma » Thu Sep 10, 20:19 2015

Gnarlbanya wrote:But knowing random factoids is more about memory and also probably a reflection of how widely you read. Whilst there's probably a correlation between wide reading and intelligence, I don't think random knowledge in and of itself is a measure of intelligence, although it might be a sign that you are intellectually curious and therefore more likely to think things through and puzzle things out.
I'd argue that that sort of things isn't necessarily a result of how widely read you are (although it would help) but a result of where your focus is. I read a ton on a lot of different things but I suck at trivia because it's always so specific. I tend to think in different terms than that. Like I'll read a book and can tell you a thousand things about the story and what colour eyes the main character's mother had but if you ask me the title I'll have no idea. I can tell you a ton about the political situation in a country but ask me how big it is and my guess will be completely wrong.

Intelligence tests are so fascinating. They claim to be objective but are so specific and biased.
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Re: Ownership of stuff and freedom

Post by Nerd1987 » Thu Sep 10, 23:04 2015

In any case I don't think anyone is arguing that doctors and lawyers are generally cognitively impaired. It's frustrating that those born into privilege, born with high intelligence, and blessed with great mental and physical health can kind of do whatever the hell they want because they have money.

Do you believe that personality tests are specific and biased? I find that my employees who score high are either very good or bullshitted the test despite the tests attempt to catch that. However the ones that score very poorly have consistently ended up failing at the job to where I stopped even interviewing them. I figure that is because if they score poor they must really not be suited to the job and no one fakes a poor score unless they have no idea what the hiring authority is looking for.

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