Mansplaining???

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Yorkshirebear

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Mansplaining???

Post by Yorkshirebear » Thu Jun 8, 6:47 2017

Hi there (Sorry if this has been posted before or posted in the wrong topic)

So I'd like some opinions on what mansplaining actually is because it seems a very vague topic.
I understand the basic idea is when a male explains something that the person he is explaining this to is actually more qualified to explain for example its when a man explains giving birth to a woman or a man explaining a scientific role to a female in said scientific role.
But in personal experience it seems people use it to point out any time a male is explaining a topic, personal experience is that I was once asked on a group chat on facebook by a female friend to explain my job to her as I was mid explanation I was told by another female "OMG stop your misogynistic mansplaining" hence the confusion on the topic.

It seems its a very wide spread term and seems its description changes as to either individual opinion or individual moment. So I'd just like to see peoples views on this. :)
I can believe things that are true and things that aren't true and I can believe things where nobody knows if they're true or not. - Neil Gaiman

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Sonic#
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Re: Mansplaining???

Post by Sonic# » Thu Jun 8, 7:30 2017

when a man explains giving birth to a woman
In addition to gender, whether it's mansplaining depends on context. If both people are doctors involved in childbirth speaking to one another at a conference, that's a case where the male doctor is not even acknowledging the possibility that she may already be an expert in this topic. That would be a transgression no matter the genders involved; "mansplaining" captures that it's less likely to happen to a man, whose expertise tends to be assumed or respected. If a male obstetrician is advising a woman in a clinical setting on what often happens in the next stage of pregnancy or childbirth, that's appropriate to the context and their respective roles.

The thread that Eravial recently posted also shows mansplaining, where the moderator takes it upon himself to explain a panelist's own history, even though she was in the process of doing so herself. The term originated from Rebecca Solnit, who had the experience of having a middle-aged man interrupt her talking about a topic only to ask if she'd read an important book on the topic. He tried to describe this book, and repeatedly refused to listen when she pointed out she had written that book.

The concept of mansplaining is related to phenomena like men tending to take up more space in public places and tending to take up more speaking time in mixed-gender meetings, even when they're in the minority.

I can't speak to Facebook group chats. :P

Graberl

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Re: Mansplaining???

Post by Graberl » Sat Jun 10, 12:24 2017

I'd like to add that, in my opinion, Mansplaining is also when a man condescendingly talks to someone of a different gender about a topic that the other person could know equal or more information regarding said topic.

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Re: Mansplaining???

Post by lillerina » Sat Jun 10, 14:39 2017

It is rooted in the assumption that the man implicitly knows more about something than the listener, regardless of circumstance or the actual listener involved.

For example, if a woodworking friend of mine, knowing that I am not a woodworker, starts telling me about some of the challenges associated with turning a bowl on a lathe, this is not mansplaining. The assumption that he knows more about woodwork than I do is rooted in actual knowledge and actual expertise on his part.

If that same friend begins explaining how socks are knitted, whether or not he knows that I am both a knitter and a sock designer, this is mansplaining. He has never picked up a knitting needle in his life and yet he assumes that he knows more about this topic than I do, sufficiently so that he feels qualified to explain it to me. It's almost like the inverse of imposter syndrome. This excessive confidence is rooted in nothing but a social expectation that he knows more than other people about stuff in general.
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Yorkshirebear

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Re: Mansplaining???

Post by Yorkshirebear » Sat Jun 10, 18:21 2017

If that same friend begins explaining how socks are knitted, whether or not he knows that I am both a knitter and a sock designer, this is mansplaining. He has never picked up a knitting needle in his life
Hi sorry I'm getting more of an idea but with that bit, if for say the friend didn't know that you knitted and discussed in general of what he knew would that still be mansplaining because he is just explaining said topic without asking first if you knew about the subject?

Also that's pretty cool that you knit, what type of stuff have you made? (I can sow, well enough and have made my partner some custom short shorts before but I feel like it's completely different using the good old wool and 2 stick thingys haha :) )
I can believe things that are true and things that aren't true and I can believe things where nobody knows if they're true or not. - Neil Gaiman

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lillerina
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Re: Mansplaining???

Post by lillerina » Sat Jun 10, 18:31 2017

Yorkshirebear wrote:
If that same friend begins explaining how socks are knitted, whether or not he knows that I am both a knitter and a sock designer, this is mansplaining. He has never picked up a knitting needle in his life
Hi sorry I'm getting more of an idea but with that bit, if for say the friend didn't know that you knitted and discussed in general of what he knew would that still be mansplaining because he is just explaining said topic without asking first if you knew about the subject?
The point is not my knowledge or his awareness thereof, it is his assumption that he has superior knowledge despite having none and/or the authority to explain something that he himself knows nothing about. A person with a PhD in particle physics isn't mansplaining when explaining particle physics to a general audience - if that same man tries to explain photography with the assumption that he is the only person present who knows anything about it (when his lay-knowledge has no specialised photography interest), that is mansplaining.

As for what I've made, start with everything. Soft furnishings, socks, sweaters/cardigans, shawls, hats, gloves, mittens, scarves and more.
If I bang my head against a brick wall five times and get five lumps, why am I surprised when I bang it a sixth time and get a sixth lump?

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SallyTimm

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Re: Mansplaining???

Post by SallyTimm » Sat Jun 10, 18:39 2017

This is one slam on men I don't like.
As a feminist I can't say "Hey, treat me like you'd treat anyone else!" and then cry that I can't handle the way a man explains things.
For awhile I would focus on a man's tendency to 'mansplain' but then I noticed "he isn't just doing this to women, it's just the way some men like to explain things in a very deliberate manner". I see men doing it to men more often than not and they dont' really seem to care.

There are some issues I'm very stern on. But this one is goofy.

And if cross gender interaction is that big of an issue, where are the same feminists who complain about this who would say nothing to how "pretty girls" treat unattractive men. I know more than enough friends of mine (and even back in my sorority days) who would outright admit that she wouldn't even respond if asked any question by certain types of men. And any woman who goes out enough and has a big enough group of friends knows this is very much true.

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Re: Mansplaining???

Post by Sonic# » Sat Jun 10, 19:08 2017

As a feminist I can't say "Hey, treat me like you'd treat anyone else!" and then cry that I can't handle the way a man explains things.
I've hardly noticed men mansplaining to me, but I've certainly noticed men mansplaining women in my life. If "the way a man explains things" means that he assumes I'm an expert but not that my just-as-expert female colleague is, then it seems justified to say, "Hey, that's a double standard."

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